Volunteering Opportunity: Civic Voice War Memorial Centenary Listing Project

Volunteering Opportunity: Civic Voice War Memorial Centenary Listing Project

civic-voice-logoThroughout the centenary of the First World War Historic England aims to add 2,500 freestanding war memorials to the National Heritage List for England (NLHE), the statutory list of heritage assets of national historic and/or architectural importance. This will give them greater protection for the future by ensuring that any proposed changes that affect their appearance and/or historic character will require consent. For the first time volunteers are being invited to play a part in this process.

This is part of the First World War Memorial Programme, a wider project that is encouraging communities to engage with their local war memorials during the centenary, to find out more about them, and conserve and protect them for the future. The programme is a partnership between Civic Voice, Historic England, Imperial War Museums and War Memorials Trust.

Purpose of the role

To contribute to the protection of England’s war memorial heritage by researching, writing and submitting list entry descriptions for inclusion on the National Heritage List for England.

Frampton Cotterell War Memorial, Gloucestershire
Frampton Cotterell War Memorial, Gloucestershire

Main Activities

  • To research the history of specific war memorials using a variety of information sources.
  • To write a description of the war memorial’s physical appearance.
  • To visit the war memorial to take photographs (desirable but not essential).
  • To use your research and observations to write a list entry description of between 200 and 500 words and submit it for inclusion on the National Heritage List for England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skills Required

Essential              Experience of using email

Experience of using Microsoft Word

Ability to write clearly and concisely

 

Desirable             Ability to use the internet

Ability to use a digital camera

Training

Full training will be provided through a series of three workshops which volunteers must attend. Following the workshops ongoing support will be provided via telephone and email.

Availability and Output Requirements

The training workshops are scheduled to take place from January 2016 (venue TBC). You will be required to research, write and submit a minimum of 8 list entry descriptions. Volunteers would spend no more than half a day visiting, researching and writing a list entry description.

War memorial, Scottow, Norfolk
War memorial, Scottow, Norfolk

What’s in it for you?

  • This role will be a valuable addition to your CV, demonstrating to potential employers how you developed and used particular skills in a real-world situation.
  • Through training and involvement in the project you will gain a greater understanding of England’s heritage protection system.
  • Your work will be included in, and form part of, the National Heritage List for England.
  • You will be part of a project of national importance and your work will have a direct impact on the protection of England’s war memorial heritage.
  • Volunteers who produce 10 or more list entry descriptions will be invited to an award ceremony at the Houses of Parliament (travel expenses reimbursed).
  • Volunteers who produce 20 or more list descriptions will receive a 50% discount on annual membership of War Memorials Trust.

 

How to get involved

If you would like to contribute to this unique opportunity to protect England’s war memorial heritage please register your interest by contacting anna.wilson@civicvoice.org.uk

 

 

Dissenting Voices and the Everyday in the First World War

Dissenting Voices and the Everyday in the First World War

Contribute to a lively exchange of ideas at this three-day event at The National Archives

 

8-10 September 2016

212308

 

This three-day conference will examine the Home Front during the First World War. It will look at those who were left behind, and explore life and society in the immediate aftermath of the war.

 

The conference will bring together academics, independent researchers, community groups and museum curators, among others, to generate dynamic discussion and networking opportunities. The event provides an opportunity for delegates to showcase recent research, foster new collaborations across the country and between different groups of researchers.

 

The conference is organised by The National Archives and the Everyday Lives in War Engagement Centre, on behalf of the five national World War One Engagement Centres funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

 

We welcome contributions from researchers working on the topics listed below.

 

Themes

The conference will explore four major themes:

 

  • Life on the home front(s)
    We are looking for contributions with an international as well as a British angle.
  • Dissent
    As well as conscientious objection and political agitation, we also want the conference to explore the subtleties of dissent socially, religiously, and culturally.
  • Aftermath
    We want to explore such issues as cultural memory, as well as immediate matters such as post-war riots, gender relations, food, and housing.
  • The unfamiliar
    We are interested in exploring the less well-known aspects of dissent and everyday life, including the value of little-used sources and the interpretation of unusual artefacts associated with the First World War.

 

We encourage proposals that speak to one of these themes from the perspective of any geographical location. Potential topics include, but are not limited to,

  • Political
    • MI5 workers
    • Radical political activism
    • Government responses to dissent
    • Female suffrage
    • Workers’ rights/unionismRussians460

 

  • Religious
    • Spiritualism
    • Christian Science responses to war
    • Prophecy
    • Religious pacifism

 

  • Social and cultural
    • Theatre and entertainment
    • Disorder – e.g. food riots in 1919 – Luton Town Hall burned down.
    • Profiteering
    • Hoarding
    • Problems with First World War pensions
    • Fortune-telling
    • Advertising
    • Newspaper reportage
    • Alien, prisoner and refugee life
    • Comedy/satire (music hall, literary, cartoons etc)
  • Gender
    • Fashion (men and women)
    • Female suffrage
    • Female farm and factory work
    • Children and role modelling (male and female)
    • Choosing motherhood and non-childbearing lives in war and after
  • Material culture
    • Graffiti
    • Pension records
    • Internment camp magazines
    • Registration cards, Belgian refugees
    • School logbooks
    • Photography
    • Food
    • Marketing and advertising

 

p01p469d

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Format

We invite proposals for presentations that take the form of group discussions, workshops, 20-minute talks, performances, or posters. Guidelines and a workshop on creating an effecti

ve poster will be offered in advance for those considering this format.

Interested in participating?

We accept applications from individuals (whom we will then match to others working on similar topics), and from groups who wish to propose their own panel and involve relevant academics. We invite academics to present with independent and community group researchers. No affiliation to an academic institution is required to submit an application.

Please send a brief description of no more than 300 words outlining the topic you wish to share and your preferred format of presentation (i.e. round-table, talk, workshop, performance or poster).

Closing Date: 15 October 2015

Proposals should be emailed to: firstworldwar@herts.ac.uk

Enquiries can be directed to: Owen Davies, The University of Hertfordshire or Jessamy Carlson, The National Archives

Interested in attending?

Tickets will be on sale from early 2016

400 years of Caribbean Contribution to British Heritage and Culture

IMAG2584This week I visited the 400 Years of Caribbean Contribution to British Heritage and Culture exhibition at Solihull Central Library. It is a fine collection of images and information about the role played by people from the Caribbean and people of Caribbean heritage, in some of the landmark events in British history.

Much of the exhibition is concerned with military and martial concerns. An early stage depicts a private of the 5th West India Regiment in 1812 while a section entitled black mariners shows an image of a relief mural from the base of Nelson’s Column showing a black seaman.

IMAG2583Naturally, large sections are dedicated to the Second World War and of course, the First, which is what prompted my interest. Much of it is biographical, with pictures, newspaper clippings and poetry dedicated to well known figures such as Walter Tull, and some (undeservedly) less celebrated ones.

Winston Churchill Millington, 1893-1991
Winston Churchill Millington, 1893-1991

Winston Churchill Millington, born in Barbados in 1893, was a member of that particular generation to have been old enough to fight in the First World War and young enough to don a uniform again for the Second. He served in the new British West Indies regiment after working in a school prior to the outbreak of war.

The appeal to men like Millington is illustrated on panels that feature the recruitment techniques used to raise volunteers. This includes general approaches, such as the ‘Empire Needs Men’ poster, as well as direct and focused campaigns, here depicted in a poster appealing to men of the Bahamas.
The exhibition is on display at the Heritage Gallery (Solihull Central Library)  until Friday 31st July 2015.
Admission is free and opening times are: Monday and Thursday 9am – 3pm. Tuesday and Friday 9am – 6pm. Wednesday 10am – 6pm. Saturday 9am – 5pm. Sunday Closed.

Dulmial Gun presentation video

Dr Irfan Malik’s Dulmial Gun project gave us one of our most popular blog posts when we covered it back in September. Dr Malik recently gave a talk about his work at a study day organised by Voices of War & Peace and held at the Library of Birmingham.

In this video, filmed by Abhinay Khoparzi, Dr Malik can be seen outlining the origins of his interest, the historical background of the gun itself, and its meaning for Dulmial.

 

Dulmial Village contribution in World War 1 by Dr Irfan Malik from Gohar Sultan on Vimeo.