Impact: Harworth Colliery Project Finale in Worksop

Pauline Codd – Harworth Colliery Researcher

On Sunday 8th April, Dr David Amos hosted the finale of his Harworth Colliery in World War One project at Worksop Library.  Funded by the Centre for Hidden Histories and produced in association with Nottingham Trent University and David’s not-for-profit community interest organisation, Mine2Minds Education, the project explored the ‘hidden history’ of the controversial development of Harworth Colliery in Nottinghamshire during the First World War.

The controversy focused on the involvement of German industrialists in a strategically important British industry (coalmining); later it was to centre on the character of Arnold Lupton, an academic, Liberal politician and mining engineer who founded the Anglo-German North Union Mining Co Ltd, which initially started developing Harworth Colliery in 1913.   Along with his pacifist views Lupton was jailed during the war for his protests against the Government for its actions over Harworth (he chained himself to the railings in Downing Street). During the First World War, German workers from Harworth colliery were interned and the Company’s property and assets eventually impounded under the Trading with the Enemy Act of 1916.

David has been leading a team of community researchers to look into this difficult, yet fascinating and important history.  The team conducted research in the Library at the National Coalmining Museum for England as well as at Kings Meadow Archives (The University of Nottingham) and at Bircotes, Worksop and Mansfield Libraries. The results of the team’s work were on display at Worksop Library on 8th April.

Comments by attendees at the launch included:

“Fascinating – a story I had not come across…Great presentation – excellent booklet – ideal location.” (Rob Armstrong, Retired)

“I learnt for the first time, how the war affected German companies and their employees…I used new research resources I did not previously know such as the National Mining Museum and Nottingham University Archives.” (Jim Dymond – Harworth Colliery Researcher)

“Love it!” (Pauline Codd – Harworth Colliery Researcher)

Alan Brittain – Harworth Colliery Researcher
Robert Illet – Harworth Colliery Researcher
UPDATE: Booking now open. Event: Community, Identity and Commemoration: Britain and the First World War

UPDATE: Booking now open. Event: Community, Identity and Commemoration: Britain and the First World War

Community, Identity and Commemoration: Britain and the First World War

Friday 23 June, Heap Lecture Theatre, University of Derby, Kedleston Road

The Passchendaele campaign, fought in the Flanders mud, provides many of the most enduring images of the Western Front. It also remains one of the most controversial battles of the War. At this public conference, the continuing reinterpretation of the battle will be discussed as we approach the 100th anniversary of the ‘Battle of Mud’.  The academic controversies concerning the Passchendaele campaign have often reflected differing viewpoints on British identity and the extent to which the War exemplified British values.  The conference will explore how the War impacted on Britain’s communities and the impact it has had on the evolution of a shared identity. It will examine the various ways in which Britain has marked the First World War centenary, examining the social, cultural and political influences that have shaped the commemorations. As the Silk Mill Museum hosts the Weeping Window, from the installation ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’ by Paul Cummins, the Conference at Derby University provides an opportunity to discuss what impact the centenary events have had on public knowledge and understanding of the Great War.

 

Timetable

13.00:    Welcome

13.15:    Dr Ian Whitehead: ‘The Battle of Mud’: Perspectives on the Passchendaele Campaign, 1917

14.00:    Break

14.15: Professor Paul Elliott: Derby Public Parks in the First World War and Beyond: Recovering a Hidden History of the Home Front

15.00:    Break

15.15:   Christopher Batten, BA (Hons): Life in Ruhleben Camp: Edwardian Britain in Microcosm

15.45:    Thomas Debaere, BA (Hons): Requiem: Foulds, Beaverbrook and a ‘British’ Festival of Remembrance

16.00:    Break

16.15:    Dr Kathleen McIlvenna: Communities, Government and Heritage: The Centenary of the First World War and Public

History

17.00:    Close

 

Booking is now open. Please click here to register your interest.

German Exchange Visit to the University of Leeds as part of the ‘In the Wrong Place, At the Wrong Time’ Project

Visitors from Spandau meet academics and descendants at the University of Leeds. Photo: Michael Franz

As part of the Centre for Hidden Histories sponsored ‘In the Wrong Place, At the Wrong Time’ project, the University of Leeds hosted ten pupils and two teachers from the Carl-Friedrich-von-Siemens-Gymnasium, a secondary school in Spandau, Berlin (27 February – 3 March 2017).  Alongside the school pupils and teachers, Dr Claudia Sternberg (University of Leeds) was joined by Dr Eva Göbel (Humboldt University), Tom Greulich of Spandau City Council as well as two members of the Youth History Workshop Spandau.

The German exchange group explored the history of World War One era internment of German and Austrian civilians and officers at Wakefield’s Lofthouse Park Camp and the internment of British civilians at the Ruhleben Camp in Spandau. They also visited Bradford’s ‘Little Germany’ where many Germans had settled in the 19th century.

On a windswept street near the former entrance to Lofthouse Park Camp. Photo: Michael Franz

Scheduled activities included meeting descendants, community-based researchers, local residents as well as young people from the Leeds-based Preservative Party and the university. Professor Matthew Stibbe, himself a descendant, spoke about the Ruhleben Camp and the rich resources held at the University of Leeds’s Liddle Collection (a treasure trove of First World War personal papers). David Stowe led a guided walk around the former site of Lofthouse Park Camp. Professor Panikos Panayi (Leicester De Montfort University) joined the group in Wakefield and later presented ‘The Global War against the German ‘Enemy Alien’: Internment in the British Empire, 1914-1920’ as part of the Legacies of War seminar series at Leeds University.

This Centre for Hidden Histories international collaboration is set to continue further into 2017-2018.  It is planned that a First World War exhibition at Spandau City Museum will contain Ruhleben material from the Liddle Collection.  This exhibition will be co-curated by the ‘In the Wrong Place, At the Wrong Time’ team and Spandau’s Youth History Workshop. The exhibition is scheduled to open in Spring 2018.

In Flux – First Public Performance

The Centre for Hidden Histories and Excavate Community Theatre are proud to present In Flux, a performance piece that examines the history of borders in the Middle East and the implications of their continuing collapse on those who live in the region and those who are fleeing from the wars that have been unleashed there.

In Flux interweaves three monologues – the history of the secretive Sykes-Picot agreement of 1916 which led to the creation of Iraq and was a key influence on the current map of the Middle East; the story of a woman whose sisters all live in Kurdistan and yet find themselves in four different countries; and a young man’s account of how he escaped the war in Syria to travel, via the Sahara desert and the Mediterranean ocean, to Nottingham.

The first public performance will take place at Nottingham Playhouse on Saturday 8th April at 8pm. The event is free but booking is essential.

With projections, live music and performers from England, Bakur, Syria and Iran this should be a provocative and enlightening evening.

There will be a collection after the performance for the Red Cross Tuesday Night Group who provide free English classes and activities to those who have just arrived in the city.

For more information and to book tickets, please visit the Nottingham Playhouse website

Untold Stories – Nottingham Women and WW1

Untold Stories – Nottingham Women and WW1

Nottingham Women’s History Group and the Centre for Hidden Histories present

Untold Stories – Nottingham Women and WW1

 

 

Saturday 1st of April 2017
2pm to 4pm
Nottinghamshire Deaf Society, 22 Forest Road West
NG7 4EQ (Nearest tram stop Nottingham High School)

Speakers include:

  • Rosemary Collins, Marion Caunt, Pauline Woodhouse on Radcliffe-on-Trent Women and World War One
  • Samraghni Bonnerjee: Nursing Stories from WWI

There will be a small exhibition and bookstall.

NO BOOKING REQUIRED

This seminar is free and has been supported by the Hidden Histories of WW1 project — University of Nottingham

For further details look at our website: www.nottinghamwomenshistory.org.uk

Or contact Val Wood on 0115 9624646